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Swimming Pool Cleaners

 

There are four main types of swimming pool cleaners, classified by the drive mechanism used·

-Return-side driven—water outflow being returned to the pool is used for locomotion and debris suction, via the venturi effect

 
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Pressure driven—a minor variation of return-side driven, water outflow is pressurized using a secondary "booster" pump. This high pressure water is used for locomotion and debris suction, via the venturi effect
 

-Suction-side driven—water being pumped out of the pool via its skimmer or drains is used for locomotion and debris suction.
 

-Robotic Pool Cleaners The robotic cleaner brushes and vacuums floors and walls up to the water line while debris is collected in an internal filter bag.

Return-side driven.
 

These types of cleaner require high amounts of flow for movement, and as a result may require a dedicated pump (see Pressure driven section below) or adjustment of returns to provided adequate flow to the cleaner.
The venturi effect forces the cleaner forward and allows it to remove of dirt, this dirt and water mixture is directed through a filter bag.
Although a number of older pool cleaners used this process in the past it has fallen out of favour due to high running costs of additional pump & adjustment of return pipework flows.
 

Pressure driven

This type is identical in principle to the return-side driven, except that a dedicated booster pump is used to provide additional water pressure and flow.

Although a number of older pool cleaners used this process in the past it has fallen out of favour due to high running costs of an additional pump

Suction-Side-Driven

This type of cleaner is usually attached via a 1.5 inch hose to a vacuum plate in the skimmer, or to a dedicated vac line on the side of the pool. The suction provided by the pool's pump causes the robot to move forward along the floor and walls of the pool picking up dirt and debris as it moves. The first automatic pool cleaner was a suction cleaner.

Robotic pool cleaners

They operate using sensors located in the bump bars, on contact with objects such as a walls they pause the machine briefly. The electronics will then restart the machine and reverse its direction. When this happens it returns in the same direction with a small offset allowing it to move one machine's width over on each crossing of the pool.

Cleaners can be equipped with a timer allowing the machine to start and stop after an adjustable period of time. This delay timer is an important feature for many pools, as many switch off a number of circulation pumps during the night to allow suspended particles to settle on the bottom of the pool; after a couple of hours the pool cleaner begins its cleaning cycle.

This cleaning cycle is set up to complete before the pumps are turned back on; this maximizes the cleaning capability of the cleaning cycle. This isn't a necessity as the cleaning capability of the pool cleaner is still considerably high regardless of the circulation pumps.

Unlike hydraulic pool cleaners, these are fitted with thick rotating brushes that thoroughly scrub the tiles clean and trap the dirt in washable filter bags. Suction power is used to grip the floor, ensuring the tiles are scrubbed clean and debris is removed from the pool.

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